Recent Changes

Wednesday, October 14

  1. page 3. Three levels of Design Visceral, Behavioral, Reflective edited ... - Niall Maher, Diesel’s director of retail operation (p. 92): “we’re conscious of the fact tha…
    ...
    - Niall Maher, Diesel’s director of retail operation (p. 92): “we’re conscious of the fact that, outwardly, we have an intimidating environment. We didn’t design our stores to be user-friendly because we want you to interact with our people. You can’t understand Diesel without talking to someone.”
    Gap and Banana Republic (p. 92):
    ...
    at ease.
    If

    If
    people don’t
    ...
    their needs?
    In the case of human-centered design:
    ...
    to success
    In the case of sales staff:
    ...
    been seeking.
    In

    In
    fashion, who
    ...
    others think.
    Mort Spivas (p. 93):
    - Super salesman
    ...
    act confident.”
    If

    If
    people believe
    ...
    a game.
    Disconcerting

    Disconcerting
    (verontrusten, op
    ...
    of purchase).
    Don’t

    Don’t
    make the shopper notice!
    Stores

    Stores
    that try
    ...
    other ones.
    Stockholm Syndrome:
    - Kidnap victims develop a positive emotional bond with their captors that, after they are freed and the captors in custody, they plead for mercy for the kidnappers.
    ...
    Douglass Rushkoff (p. 93):
    Media critic
    DESIGN BY COMMITTEE VERSUS BY AN INDIVIDUAL
    In design, appealing to the intellect is no guarantee of success. Many serious works of art and music are relatively unintelligible (onbegrijpbaar) to the average person. In art and literature, it would appear that when something can be clearly understood, it is judged as flawed, whereas when something cannot clearly be understood, it must of necessity be good.
    Example: Fritz Lang’s classic film ‘Metropolis’:
    - A wildly ambitious, hugely expensive science fiction allegory of filial revolt, romantic love, alienated labor and dehumanizing technology.
    - First shown in Berlin in 1926, but the American distributor, Paramount Films, complained that it was unintelligible.
    - They hired Channing Pollock, a playwright, to reedit the film. Pollock complained that ‘symbolism ran such riot that people who saw it couldn’t tell what the picture was all about’.
    Whether or not one agrees with Pollock’s criticism. There is no doubt that too much intellectualism can certainly get in the way of pleasure and enjoyment.
    There is a fundamental conflict between the preferences of the popular audience and the desires of the intellectual and artistic community.
    Artistic integrity, a cohesive thematic approach, and deep substance seldom come from committees. The best designs come from following a cohesive theme throughout, with a clear vision and focus. Usually, such design are driven by the vision of one person.
    Iterative, human-centered approach works well for behavioral design, but it is not necessarily appropriate for either the visceral f the reflective side.
    Henry Lieberman (p. 98):
    - A research scientist at the MIT Media Laboratory
    - Has described the case ‘design by committee’ p. 98

    (view changes)
    7:41 am
  2. page 3. Three levels of Design Visceral, Behavioral, Reflective edited ... Motorola Headset, designed by Walter Herbst (Herbst LaZar Bell): - Walter: “the most difficu…
    ...
    Motorola Headset, designed by Walter Herbst (Herbst LaZar Bell):
    - Walter: “the most difficult part about it, was making the coaches feel good about wearing it.” (p. 89)
    ...
    satisfied (comfortable).
    - Design: small, lightweight, comfortable à not strong enough! à Coaches rejected them.
    ...
    the coaches).
    - “The main goal in designing the Coaches Headset, was to create a cool new look for the product that is often overlooked as a background item, and turn it into an image-building product that attracts the viewer’s attention even in the high energy, action-packed context of the football game.” (p. 91)
    THE DEVIOUS SIDE OF DESIGN
    Diesel store, Union Square West (p. 92):
    - Feels like stumbling into a rave; techno music pounds at a mind-rattling level, a television plays a video of a Japanese boxing match, there are no helpful signs pointing to men’s and women’s departments, and no obvious staff members.
    - Niall Maher, Diesel’s director of retail operation (p. 92): “we’re conscious of the fact that, outwardly, we have an intimidating environment. We didn’t design our stores to be user-friendly because we want you to interact with our people. You can’t understand Diesel without talking to someone.”
    Gap and Banana Republic (p. 92):
    - Large clothing retailers, have they layout of their stores standardized and simplified in an effort to put customers at ease.
    If people don’t really know what they want, what is the best way to satisfy their needs?
    In the case of human-centered design:
    - Provide them with the tools to explore by themselves, to try, to empower themselves to success
    In the case of sales staff:
    - It’s an opportunity to present themselves as rescuers ‘in-shining-armor’, ready to offer assistance, to provide just the answer customers will be led to believe they had been seeking.
    In fashion, who is to say which approach is right? People have preferences, some people prefer Gap’s approach, some Diesel’s. The stores serve different needs. The first is more utilitarian, the second pure fashion, where the whole goal is caring about what others think.
    Mort Spivas (p. 93):
    - Super salesman
    - Tells Douglass Rushkoff: “when you’re wearing a thousand-dollar suit, you project a different aura. And then people treat you differently. You exude confidence. And if you can feel confident, you’ll act confident.”
    If people believe that it makes them different, then it does make them different. For fashion, emotions are key. It’s a game.
    Disconcerting (verontrusten, op het andere been zetten) customers as a selling tool is no news. Put related items nearby others, and people will buy them too. Put the not frequently purchased products nearby frequently purchased products, and people will buy them as well (points of purchase).
    Don’t make the shopper notice!
    Stores that try to profit through confusion often enjoy a meteoric rise in sales and popularity, but suffer a similar meteoric fall as well. When shoppers realize they’re being manipulated, they desert them and visit other ones.
    Stockholm Syndrome:
    - Kidnap victims develop a positive emotional bond with their captors that, after they are freed and the captors in custody, they plead for mercy for the kidnappers.
    - Customers develop a bond with the salesperson
    Douglass Rushkoff (p. 93):
    Media critic

    (view changes)
    7:11 am
  3. page home edited Kunnen we misschien even msn adressen uitwisselen? roger@verscheijden.nl armellaa123@hotmail.comst…
    Kunnen we misschien even msn adressen uitwisselen? roger@verscheijden.nl armellaa123@hotmail.comsteinvdven@gmail.com
    Ik heb jullie toegevoegd! Even met zn allen in een gesprek om duidelijk te maken wat de bedoeling van die presentatie is en wat we ermee gaan doen?
    -
    Ok, aangezien de tijd begint te dringen en we denk ik wel die 20% van het eindcijfer willen binnen halen moeten we nu een centrale vraagstelling hebben zodat we deze kunnen uitwerken volgens de schijf van 5 ( op bb staat deze ) en hierna een presentatie verdeling kunnen maken die ieder dan voor zichzelf kan uitwerken.
    Ik vond het reflective design element wel interessant omdat dit in een breed scala van onderwerpen uitgewerkt kan worden en omdat dit goed samenhangt met de 2 bovenliggende levels: visceral en behavorial. De vraag is om even na te denken over potentiële onderwerpen zodat we vooruit kunnen. Typ ze hier onder

    Onderwerpen voor vraagstellingen:vraagstellingen (paper):
    Hoe bepaald de moderne techniek de film industrie? ( denk aan cultuur, techniek ( minority report )
    In hoe verre geven films een toekomstbeeld?( "" )
    (view changes)
  4. page Namenregister edited ... Kaori Kashimura - Chapter 1 (w M. Kurosi) Masaaki Kurosi - Chapter 1 (w K. Kashimura) Mini …
    ...
    Kaori Kashimura - Chapter 1 (w M. Kurosi)
    Masaaki Kurosi - Chapter 1 (w K. Kashimura)
    Mini Cooper - Prologue
    Motorola Headset - Chapter 3, p. 89-92
    National Football League Headset - Chapter 3, p. 89-92
    (view changes)
    4:52 am
  5. page Namenregister edited Apple Wil iedereen hier de namen + hoofdstuk + blz neerzetten van de personen die je tegenkomt in…
    AppleWil iedereen hier de namen + hoofdstuk + blz neerzetten van de personen die je tegenkomt in het boek?
    Apple
    Computer example
    ...
    3, p. 6868; p. 9; p. 42; p. 214
    Isaac Asimov - Chapter 7, p. 195

    Hugues Belanger - Chapter 3, p. 63
    Yogi Berra - Chapter 2
    ...
    Hewlett Packard (example) - Chapter 3, p. 83
    IDEO, Tech Box - Chapter 3, p. 78-79
    Alice Isen -- Chapter 1
    Kaori Kashimura - Chapter 1 (w M. Kurosi)
    Masaaki Kurosi - Chapter 1 (w K. Kashimura)
    ...
    Eugene Rochberg-Halton - Chapter 2 (w M. Csikszentmihalyi)
    Herma Rosenthal - Chapter 2, p. 55 (w B. Goebert)
    Lucius Annaeus Seneca - Chapter 5, p. 148
    Swatch - Chapter 3, p. 86
    J.R.R. Tolkien - Chapter 1
    (view changes)
    4:46 am
  6. page Namenregister edited Apple Computer example - Chapter 3, p. 68 Hugues Belanger - Chapter 3, p. 63 Yogi Berra - Chapte…
    Apple Computer example - Chapter 3, p. 68
    Hugues Belanger - Chapter 3, p. 63
    Yogi Berra - Chapter 2
    Café des Architectes Sofitel Hotel, Chicago - Chapter 3, p. 63
    Betty Crocker Company - Chapter 2, p. 55
    Del Coates - Chapter 3, p. 87
    Amy Cowen - Chapter 2
    Mihaly Csikszentmihaly - Chapter 2 (w E. Rochberg-Halton)
    Thomas Edison - Chapter 3, p. 71
    David Frohlich - Chapter 2
    Bonny Goebert - Chapter 2, p. 55 (w H. Rosenthal)
    Heathkit Company - Chapter 2, p. 55
    Walter Herbst - Chapter 3, p. 74, p. 89
    Herbst LaZar Bell - Chapter 3, p. 74
    Hewlett Packard (example) - Chapter 3, p. 83
    IDEO, Tech Box - Chapter 3, p. 78-79
    Alice Isen - Chapter 1
    Kaori Kashimura - Chapter 1 (w M. Kurosi)
    Masaaki Kurosi - Chapter 1 (w K. Kashimura)
    Motorola Headset - Chapter 3, p. 89-92
    National Football League Headset - Chapter 3, p. 89-92
    Andrew Ortony - Chapter 1 (w W.Revelle)
    Herbert Read - Chapter 1
    William Revelle - Chapter 1 (w A. Ortony)
    Eugene Rochberg-Halton - Chapter 2 (w M. Csikszentmihalyi)
    Herma Rosenthal - Chapter 2, p. 55 (w B. Goebert)
    Swatch - Chapter 3, p. 86
    J.R.R. Tolkien - Chapter 1
    Noam Tractinsky - Chapter 1
    Sergio Zyman - Chapter 2, p. 60

    (view changes)
    4:39 am
  7. page Epilogue edited Epilogue The design of things has a lot to do with the feeling someone has with the product. E…

    Epilogue
    The design of things has a lot to do with the feeling someone has with the product. Everybody thinks different and sees things different. Everybody has a certain feeling about products, especially the things they own themselve. Almost everybody has a mobile phone, and a lot of people have the same model, but it's the use in everyday life that make them unique. Every phone has different scratches or dents al causes by something the owner did. We get used to these imperfections and this is exactly what makes something so valuable for us. If you have had a Nokia 6310 for a long time and somebody else gives you his Nokia 6310 it will feel different, you will notice this is not your telephone and it won't feel as good as your own good old Nokia. It gives a kind of character to an object.
    People want to customize their stuff. On the internet you can 'design' your own shoe, mobile phones and ipods come in 20 different colours, etc. People upgrade and customize their cars, theri interiors and their clothes. Eventhough most of the times the customization is limited to a couple of colours, some different layouts or just a few possibilities, but still this helps people to create a better feeling with their product.
    (view changes)
    3:50 am
  8. page Epilogue edited Type The design of things has a lot to do with the feeling someone has with the product. Everyb…
    Type
    The design of things has a lot to do with the feeling someone has with the product. Everybody thinks different and sees things different. Everybody has a certain feeling about products, especially the things they own themselve. Almost everybody has a mobile phone, and a lot of people have the same model, but it's the use
    in everyday life that make them unique. Every phone has different scratches or dents al causes by something the owner did. We get used to these imperfections and this is exactly what makes something so valuable for us. If you have had a Nokia 6310 for a long time and somebody else gives you his Nokia 6310 it will feel different, you will notice this is not your telephone and it won't feel as good as your own good old Nokia. It gives a kind of character to an object.
    People want to customize their stuff. On the internet you can 'design' your own shoe, mobile phones and ipods come in 20 different colours, etc. People upgrade and customize their cars, theri interiors and their clothes. Eventhough most of the times
    the contentcustomization is limited to a couple of colours, some different layouts or just a few possibilities, but still this helps people to create a better feeling with their product.
    If you want to have a product that matches exactly with
    your page here.personal preferences, a product completely designed for you, you have to design it yourself. A proffesional designer can make a product that looks extremely beautifull, that fullfills our needs, that are easy to understand, and that we really like. But they can't make something personal, something we bond to. This can only be done by you.
    (view changes)
    3:49 am
  9. page home edited Kunnen we misschien even msn adressen uitwisselen? roger@verscheijden.nl armellaa123@hotmail.comste…
    Kunnen we misschien even msn adressen uitwisselen? roger@verscheijden.nl armellaa123@hotmail.comsteinvdven@gmail.com
    Ik heb jullie toegevoegd! Even met zn allen in een gesprek om duidelijk te maken wat de bedoeling van die presentatie is en wat we ermee gaan doen?
    -

    Ok, aangezien de tijd begint te dringen en we denk ik wel die 20% van het eindcijfer willen binnen halen moeten we nu een centrale vraagstelling hebben zodat we deze kunnen uitwerken volgens de schijf van 5 ( op bb staat deze ) en hierna een presentatie verdeling kunnen maken die ieder dan voor zichzelf kan uitwerken.
    Ik vond het reflective design element wel interessant omdat dit in een breed scala van onderwerpen uitgewerkt kan worden en omdat dit goed samenhangt met de 2 bovenliggende levels: visceral en behavorial. De vraag is om even na te denken over potentiële onderwerpen zodat we vooruit kunnen. Typ ze hier onder
    (view changes)
    3:43 am

More